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Hebes: The Wonders of This Plant to Cure What Ails You

Hebe is a genus of about 250 species of evergreen plants growing in the alpine regions of the Northern Hemisphere. These small and delicate herbaceous plants are native to the mountainous areas above the tree line from Central Asia eastward through Japan, north-central Europe, Siberia, northern Canada and the Pacific Coast of North America. Although they look like miniature versions of arborvitae ( Click Here to Know More About Arborvitae ), their similarities end there. These stunning little shrubs are members of the family Ericaaceae which also includes Heaths and Heathers. They produce showy Flowers which appear in early spring before the leaves emerge. The name Hebe comes from Greek mythology where Hebe was the goddess of youth – fitting as these plants seem to possess everlasting youthfulness! Let’s take a closer look at some fascinating facts about these amazing plants…

 

Hebe Plant: A Little Background

Hebe is a genus of about 250 species of evergreen plants growing in the alpine regions of the Northern Hemisphere. These small and delicate herbaceous plants are native to the mountainous areas above the tree line from Central Asia eastward through Japan, north-central Europe, Siberia, northern Canada and the Pacific Coast of North America. Although they look like miniature versions of arborvitae ( Click Here to Know More About Arborvitae ), their similarities end there. These stunning little shrubs are members of the family Ericaaceae which also includes Heaths and Heathers. They produce showy Flowers which appear in early spring before the leaves emerge. The name Hebe comes from Greek mythology where Hebe was the goddess of youth – fitting as these plants seem to possess everlasting youthfulness! Let’s take a closer look at some fascinating facts about these amazing plants… Hebes

 

Hebe Plant Care and Cultivation

The Hebes are easy to grow in the garden and generally require little care. They do best in a well-drained, slightly acidic soil. The most common species grown in the U.S., H. americana, prefers part shade and thrives in USDA hardiness zones 3-8. Hebes can be propagated by division or by seed. Division is easiest when the plants are dormant (late winter) but it can also be done at any time of year if the plants are not too large or crowded. Seed propagation is more difficult than division and requires cool stratification for successful germination. The most popular use for these plants is as containerized evergreens with many different cultivars available to suit your color preferences as well as regional needs and tastes. They can be used to fill empty corners of your yard with great foliage interest all year long!

 

Hebe Varieties and Their Uses

As mentioned earlier, there are about 250 species in the Hebe genus. They vary in size, shape and color, with some of them being evergreen while others are deciduous. Some varieties have plain green leaves while others are variegated or variegated with silver stripes. Hebes belong to the family Ericaaceae which also includes Heaths and Heathers. So there are many similarities between these two plants even though they differ in a few ways. For example, Hebes have smaller flowers than Heathers and their blossoms also come out before the leaves appear as opposed to after as is the case with Heathers. However, unlike Heathers, Hebes produce berries that may be either red or green. The most common use for these plants is as ornamental shrubs for garden borders, rock gardens or mixed planting beds where they provide an excellent backdrop for other flowering plants such as primroses and tulips. You can also use them along pathways or as hedges and screens – because of their delicate appearance some people plant them around their homes for protection!

 

Hebe for Skin Conditions

Hebe plants are perfect for the medicinal gardener. Hebes are used in the herbal medicine of China and Japan where they are used to treat liver and stomach ailments, sore throats, inflammation, diarrhea, fevers and bronchitis. The leaves of certain types of Hebes are traditionally chewed by Nepalese villagers to cure dysentery. In addition to these traditional uses, Hebes have also been found to be a natural remedy for skin conditions including acne. It’s thought that one of the chemicals present in some species may help fight bacteria that can cause acne. To make an infusion, you can steep a handful of Hebe leaves in boiling water for about 10 minutes (or until the liquid turns green). Drink this tea three times a day before meals to keep your skin healthy!

 

Hebe for Hair Care

Hebes are great for hair care. They have anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties which will help fight dandruff, dry scalp and excess oil production. Adding to their benefits, they also have a high vitamin C content which will help promote new hair growth. Hebe plants are beautiful and versatile! They grow in the mountainous regions of Northern Hemisphere and produce showy flowers before their leaves emerge in early spring. The genus Hebe has about 250 species of evergreen herbaceous plants. Hebes are better than arborvitae as they are evergreen, grow in the mountains and have anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties which will help fight dandruff, dry scalp, excess oil production, vitamin C content that promotes new hair growth!

 

Hebe for Digestive Health

Hebe is a natural remedy for the stomach and digestive system. It can help with nausea, bloating, gas, diarrhea and constipation. Hebe has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to soothe the digestive tract and relieve stomach pain. In Traditional Tibetan Medicine, hebe is also used to improve digestion as well as alleviate abdominal discomfort. In Japan, hebe is often grown on farms because it helps with lactation. The Japanese grow hebe to make dried leaves (called Hebi-cha) which are brewed into a tea to stimulate milk production in nursing mothers. Here are some ways you can use hebe for your digestive health: -Take 20 to 40 drops of tincture or 2 to 3 teaspoons of powdered leaf three times a day; -Make an herbal tea by steeping 1 teaspoon of dried herb in 1 cup of boiling water for 5 minutes; or -Add one tablespoon chopped fresh herb to salads or other dishes several times per week.

 

Conclusion

Hebe is a plant with many therapeutic properties and has been used traditionally in Asia for centuries. It is possible to cultivate and harvest your own hebes at home, but it can be time consuming and requires a lot of space. If you don’t have the time, space or energy to grow your own plant, hebes are readily available for purchase at many nurseries and garden centers.

This article is provided by  https://www.gardenbeauty.co.uk/hebes

https://www.gardenbeauty.co.uk/hebes

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